Thursday, February 26, 2015

#teachagtech -> How to Use Google Forms for Easy ID Quizzes





How to Use Google Forms for Easy ID Quizzes:  I made a vow several years ago after grading I don't know how many identification quizzes that someday I would go paperless.  Looking back now, I know it was quite a lofty goal, but as technology becomes more user friendly, not one that isn't unattainable now.  Some experience in the classroom and a more grounded approach to life has definitely shown me that not all examinations should be given on paper or a computer, but there are definitely times when it would be most efficient and effective to test and provide feedback via a technological interface.

Here enters Google Forms.  I have already provided one post on the use of Google Forms for Formative Assessment, but wanted to share a system I use on a weekly basis to quiz students on various identification quizzes.  I use this heavily with my Floriculture and Veterinary Science class, but also use it in Intro to Ag Mechanics to ask students to identify parts and tools.

In the following video, I show you how to go about creating a Google Form that will streamline your assessment process when it comes to ID quizzes.





As I mentioned in the video, I would provide students with a hard copy of the name selections.  This seems to reduce test anxiety and provides students with an organizational tool as they progress through the quiz.




Yours in the Quest to be a Tech Savvy Aggie,






#GlobalTeachAg: Nur Husna, Visiting Global Teach Ag! Fellow, discusses agriculture education in Malaysia




Earlier this month, Nur Husna, a Ph.D. Candidate in Workforce Education from Malaysia, delivered a presentation about Malaysia and their school based agriculture education system. If you missed out on the opportunity to hear her speak, she provided in depth knowledge on what education majors and teachers have to go through to get certified in their field. 

One interesting thing is that teachers have to sign a contract and abide by the following rules when they are in their field. Below are just some of the responsibilities and rules that these teachers have to follow.

Ministry of education Malaysia: Teacher education Financing terms/ contract
Student teacher Responsibilities
1)    Must successfully complete their studies within the prescribed period
2)    Not allow to change area  study and / or place of study to University or institution other than the one designated
3)    Must strive  very hard to study by attending lectures, seminars, tutorials, lectures and any program carried out in connection with the study

Discipline
1) Must always adhere to the rules and discipline as in force at the university or institution
2) Not Allow to take part in any demonstrations 3) Not allow participate directly or indirectly in any political party
4) Not allow to engage in any conduct or activities that may affect the study


Serve the Government
1)    Will serve the government as determine by the government  after graduation


Teacher Pledge when entering the teaching profession
I promise to:
1)    Always be obedient to His Majesty the King, the country and the government
2)    Always carry out my duties with conscientiously, earnest, efficient, trustworthy, and responsible.
3)    Will not neglect my duty for my personal interests
4)    Will not use my position as public servants for my personal benefit
5)    Will not behave in a way that can aggravate and discredit the public services


Serve the Government
1)    Will serve the government as determine by the government  after graduation

As you can see by these lists, you begin to notice that teachers are under watch by several people and they take their jobs very seriously like we do in America.
After the presentation, I was able to interview Nur to ask her more questions about her presentation. In the interview below, questions were asked based on her presentation and other stories that she had to help us see what her country was like. Check out the video!




If you would like to watch the full seminar, please click on the video below (18 minutes) and watch an abbreviated presentation created by Nur in our PSU One-Button Studio!




To learn more about starting on the path to having a career that makes a positive impact on the lives of students across the globe by becoming an agricultural educator, please contact the agricultural teacher education program at teachag@psu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at TeachAgPSU, on Facebook, or on our blog!
Olivia Murphy-Sweet
2016 Student Teacher Candidate
Blog Editor
@OSweetMurph

Monday, February 23, 2015

#psuaged15: Morgan Campbell explains her unique, chaotic, awesome, student teaching expirence #teachag

Each week, the Penn State Ag Ed Roars! Blog will highlight a student teacher that is out in the field teaching and learning valuable experiences that they can use in their future! Morgan Campbell (@mcamp400) is teaching at Mifflinburg Area High School under the supervision of Mr. Chuck Kessler in Mifflinburg, PA.
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Morgan Campbell (@mcamp400)
If you would have asked me four months ago what student teaching would be like, I would have given you an idealistic picture of perfectly planned units, well-behaved students and flawlessly executed lessons. To say the least, my student teaching experience has been far from my expectations…. And that’s okay!
 

In the short five weeks that I have been at Mifflinburg Area High School, I have been thrown my fair share of curveballs. Not only did I begin teaching my third day there, but I also picked up four additional classes within the first three weeks. Many of the units that I had planned had to be majorly overhauled and I found out that I would be picking up some additional units later on. Throw in some schedule changes and snow days, and you have a recipe for panic… and that’s what I did!

Morgan Campbell teaching in a shop class.
Anyone who knows me can assure that I am extremely detail-oriented. I thrive on structure and I like to know exactly what I am doing, when. This combination of changes and alterations had me feeling very overwhelmed, but after taking a step back, I realized that rarely (if ever) does anything go perfectly as planned in education. Mr. Kessler has said it once, and I’m sure that he will say it again; “education is about being on Plan B or Plan C”. I am finding more and more truth in these words as I gain experience at the front of the classroom.


While these changes have caused a bit of chaos thus far and the idealistic picture in my mind has faded, I believe that embracing these changes is helping me find my feet as an educator. I am being stretched (far) from my comfort zone, but this has prepared me for the realities that a teacher faces on a daily basis… and for that I am thankful!



To learn more about starting on the path to having a career that makes a positive impact on the lives of students across the globe by becoming an agricultural educator, please contact the agricultural teacher education program at teachag@psu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at TeachAgPSU, on Facebook, or on our blog!
 
 
Olivia Murphy-Sweet
2016 Student Teacher Candidate
Blog Editor
@OSweetMurph





Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Words of Wisdom Wednesday: Ellen Thompson shares views on job placement strategies #teachag #WOWW

Ellen Thompson (@ellencthompson) has been selected to be Penn State Ag Ed Roars! first Words of Wisdom Wednesday participant on this blog. She is the Project Director for the National Teach Ag Campaign and works hard everyday spreading the word that the world NEEDS more agriculture educators to fill our national shortage. Ellen shares today some important strategies that you should consider when looking at open teaching positions in high schools.
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I knew the moment I saw the vacancy post for the Sauk Centre agriculture teacher position that it was the place for me.  I was even more convinced when I walked in the door for my interview.  Eight years later with tear filled eyes I left Sauk Centre to move to South Dakota.  The honor and privilege of being part of that school and community stays with me to this day.  It was the house that built me.  I cannot imagine teaching anywhere else.  
 
Accepting a teaching position is more than just accepting a job.  You are making a commitment to the mission of the school and developing a connection to the community.    You should feel welcome, excited and at home.  The best way to know if the school is a right fit is to spend some time ahead of the interview on the school website, perusing the local newspaper and dropping in on a few businesses either before or after your interview.  Bring along questions that will help you get to know more about the school.  I recommend these as a starting point…
  • What are you most proud of at your school? 
  • I noticed your graduation rate is higher than the state average, what do you attribute this success to?
  • What do you want the ag program to look like in 5 years? 
  • What is your policy regarding professional development?
  • What would the parents in the community say are the schools greatest assets (also ask some parents the same question if possible)? 
  • What is the new teacher on boarding process? 
Listen carefully to how they respond to these questions.  The answers will tell you what the school values so you know if their values match yours.  As an agriculture education major you are precious commodity and school knows it.  Make sure you start your career off in a school that supports you, challenges you and has similar educational goals.  
 

To learn more about starting on the path to having a career that makes a positive impact on the lives of students across the globe by becoming an agricultural educator, please contact the agricultural teacher education program at teachag@psu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at TeachAgPSU, on Facebook, or on our blog!
 
 
Olivia Murphy-Sweet
2016 Student Teacher Candidate
Blog Editor
@OSweetMurph

Monday, February 16, 2015

#psuaged15: Bryanna Kenno (@bkenno) shares expierences from student teaching five weeks in! #teachag

Each week, the Penn State Ag Ed Roars! Blog will highlight a student teacher that is out in the field teaching and learning valuable experiences that they can use in their future! Bryanna Kenno (@bkenno) is teaching at Elizabeth Town Area High School under the supervision of Mr. Mark Anderson (@deucehorse1) in Lancaster County, PA.  
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Bryanna Kenno assisting a student.
So I was asked to write a blog post about my time as a student teacher so far…where do I even begin?! Student teaching has been an experience unlike any other and I can’t believe I am five weeks in already! I have such a great group of students, an awesome FFA officer team, and a wonderful cooperating teacher. I am teaching aquatic resources, agricultural mechanics, and agribusiness management; Elizabethtown has block scheduling. So much has happened in these last five weeks, both good and bad, and I am super excited to see what the remaining nine weeks have in store!

My favorite part of student teaching is working with Elizabethtown students and Mr. Anderson. I am blessed that I have the opportunity to work with outstanding people here at Elizabethtown. I am constantly learning from my students and my cooperating teacher as this experience goes along. I think the most interesting thing that has happened so far was on the day of my first university supervisor’s visit by Dr. Ewing. In early February, he visited and observed me teaching my aquatic resources class. During the last ten minutes of class, I ran out of the classroom and threw up all over the bathroom. It ended up being a 24 hour stomach bug and Dr. Ewing and I continue to joke about it!
Bryanna Kenno weighing fish in her aquatic
resources class.

One thing that I encountered while student teaching so far that I didn’t think I would experience is so many students having individualized education plans (IEPs). In two of my classes, right around half of the students have IEPs. It has probably been the most challenging thing I have experienced and has definitely helped me grow as a teacher. While it is challenging at times, it is also rewarding. I was informed that it would take one of my students 6-8 weeks to warm up, become involved, and complete work. Within three weeks of classes, this is one of my more involved students! I feel like I have impacted this student in a positive way and it is awesome! My experience at Elizabethtown has been amazing so far and I look forward to the rest of my time here!

If you would like to keep up with Bryanna's day to day activities, check out her blog at: http://fulfillingmyniche.blogspot.com/ 



To learn more about starting on the path to having a career that makes a positive impact on the lives of students across the globe by becoming an agricultural educator, please contact the agricultural teacher education program at teachag@psu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at TeachAgPSU, on Facebook, or on our blog!
 
 
Olivia Murphy-Sweet
2016 Student Teacher Candidate
Blog Editor
@OSweetMurph

Thursday, February 12, 2015

#TBT 2015 Teach Ag! Society Officer Team announced at Annual Christmas Party! #teachag


Throwing it back to when we announced the 2015-2016 student officer team, we wanted to inform the public on who is on this new officer team! Due to some changes, positions that students hold are different, but we are very excited to see how they will take this year to new heights!

Announcing the 2015-2016 Teach Ag! Officer Team

President: Janae Herr

Vice President of Program Development: Olivia Murphy-Sweet

Vice President of Membership Development: Kayla Hack

Treasurer: Katie Andrews

Secretary: Erin Yoest

Stakeholder Liaison: Mike Swartwood

Ag Student Council Rep: Matt Holt and Addie Snyder

Officers (left to right): Mike Swartwood, Kayla Hack, Erin Yoest,
Janae Herr, Olivia Murphy-Sweet, Katie Andrews.
(Some officers not pictured)
 
If you would like to get involved with Teach Ag! Society, our next meeting will be February 23rd in Ferguson Building!


To learn more about starting on the path to having a career that makes a positive impact on the lives of students across the globe by becoming an agricultural educator, please contact the agricultural teacher education program at teachag@psu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at TeachAgPSU, on Facebook, or on our blog!



 
Olivia Murphy-Sweet
2016 Student Teacher Candidate
Blog Editor
@OSweetMurph
 

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Food for Thought: Greenwood Global Hunger Banquet #feedtheworld


Penn State Students enjoying the meal!
On February 6th, Greenwood FFA hosted their third annual “Hunger Banquet” at Greenwood Elementary School. This event hosted over 135 people consisting of FFA students, college students, guest speakers, and FFA advisors! If you have never heard of a “Hunger Banquet” before, it is an awesome event that really makes you truly think how fortunate you are to have a meal three times a day.
As you walk into the room, you are handed an envelope with money according to a low, middle, and high incomes. Once everyone arrived, the people with the most amount of money in their envelope were able to be the first “shopper” and buy their meal. This continued until the lowest income class received whatever leftovers weren’t taken. As you ate your meal around others that didn’t have anything next to them, it made the attendants enlightened and inspired towards the end of the meal. After the meal concluded, a speaker from USAID Kevin Faith, an Agriculture Development Specialist, spoke on hunger issues on a global level. Not only did this high school complete an awesome banquet, but they raised over $2,600 for the PerryCounty Food Bank! Overall, it was a great night with tons of learning opportunities and a chance to realize how much people rely on food every day.


If you would like more information about this banquet, you can contact Krista Pontius at kpontius@greenwoodsd.org.

To learn more about starting on the path to having a career that makes a positive impact on the lives of students across the globe by becoming an agricultural educator, please contact the agricultural teacher education program at teachag@psu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at TeachAgPSU, on Facebook, or on our blog!
Olivia Murphy-Sweet
2016 Student Teacher Candidate
Blog Editor
@OSweetMurph